thedailywhat:

Phone Hacking Scandal News Update of the Day: News of the World whistleblower Sean Hoare was found dead this morning in his Watford home by Hertfordshire police. The former News of the World showbiz reporter was the first to explicitly state that former editor Andy Coulson was not only aware of the phone hacking by staff members, but was actively encouraging it.
Coulson denied allegations that he knew phones were being hacked under his watch, but Hoare told the BBC Coulson was lying, and that he had personally been asked by Coulson to tap into phones.
A police statement concerning Hoare’s death stated that while it was “currently being treated as unexplained,” it was “not thought to be suspicious.”
Elsewhere, the Wall Street Journal joined its sister company Fox News in attempting to downplay the severity of the charges brought against its parent, saying their “competitor-critics” want “readers to believe, based on no evidence, that the tabloid excesses of one publication somehow tarnish thousands of other News Corp. journalists across the world.”
For those apt to see the Phone Hacking reports as naught but Schadenfreude (which the WSJ says is “so thick you can’t cut it with a chainsaw”), Salon’s Alex Pareene offers a helpful refresher on the scandal so far:

News Corp. is accused of not  just phone-hacking but also bribery of police officers and illegal  access to private medical and banking records, obtained with the  assistance of multiple private investigators and a convicted con artist. The crimes may not have been limited to the now-shuttered News of the World, but may have also included the Sunday Times. News Corp. withheld information from Parliament and paid hush money to  hacking victims in order to avoid making the extent of its crimes  public. People in charge of the News of the World during the hacking and  the coverup of the hacking went on to much more powerful and  influential positions in News Corp. and in the current Conservative  government. The Guardian’s suggested questions for Rebekah Brooks, James Murdoch and Rupert Murdoch are also a good summary of the scandal as we now understand it.

And in a late addition to the Schadenfreude-fueled “not thought to be suspicious” file, Rebekah Brooks’ husband Charlie unsuccessfully attempted to retrieve a bag found in a garbage bin near their home that reportedly contains a computer, a phone, and paperwork. The contents of the bag are now being examined by police.
[guardian: 1,2 / wsj / salon.]
Related: LulzSec is back. First order of business: Redirect The Sun’s homepage to a story about Rupert Murdoch’s death.
UPDATE: Screencaps the LulzSec hack (original site has been taken down); LulzSec promises more to come.


rebloged twice b/c its important

thedailywhat:

Phone Hacking Scandal News Update of the Day: News of the World whistleblower Sean Hoare was found dead this morning in his Watford home by Hertfordshire police. The former News of the World showbiz reporter was the first to explicitly state that former editor Andy Coulson was not only aware of the phone hacking by staff members, but was actively encouraging it.

Coulson denied allegations that he knew phones were being hacked under his watch, but Hoare told the BBC Coulson was lying, and that he had personally been asked by Coulson to tap into phones.

A police statement concerning Hoare’s death stated that while it was “currently being treated as unexplained,” it was “not thought to be suspicious.”

Elsewhere, the Wall Street Journal joined its sister company Fox News in attempting to downplay the severity of the charges brought against its parent, saying their “competitor-critics” want “readers to believe, based on no evidence, that the tabloid excesses of one publication somehow tarnish thousands of other News Corp. journalists across the world.”

For those apt to see the Phone Hacking reports as naught but Schadenfreude (which the WSJ says is “so thick you can’t cut it with a chainsaw”), Salon’s Alex Pareene offers a helpful refresher on the scandal so far:

News Corp. is accused of not just phone-hacking but also bribery of police officers and illegal access to private medical and banking records, obtained with the assistance of multiple private investigators and a convicted con artist. The crimes may not have been limited to the now-shuttered News of the World, but may have also included the Sunday Times. News Corp. withheld information from Parliament and paid hush money to hacking victims in order to avoid making the extent of its crimes public. People in charge of the News of the World during the hacking and the coverup of the hacking went on to much more powerful and influential positions in News Corp. and in the current Conservative government. The Guardian’s suggested questions for Rebekah Brooks, James Murdoch and Rupert Murdoch are also a good summary of the scandal as we now understand it.

And in a late addition to the Schadenfreude-fueled “not thought to be suspicious” file, Rebekah Brooks’ husband Charlie unsuccessfully attempted to retrieve a bag found in a garbage bin near their home that reportedly contains a computer, a phone, and paperwork. The contents of the bag are now being examined by police.

[guardian: 1,2 / wsj / salon.]

Related: LulzSec is back. First order of business: Redirect The Sun’s homepage to a story about Rupert Murdoch’s death.

UPDATE: Screencaps the LulzSec hack (original site has been taken down); LulzSec promises more to come.

rebloged twice b/c its important

(Reblogged from thedailywhat)

Notes

  1. the-towns-finest reblogged this from thedailywhat
  2. jjarichardson reblogged this from thedailywhat
  3. basednkrumah reblogged this from thelunaticyouarelookingfor
  4. neontommy reblogged this from thedailywhat
  5. peterharris said: Are you guys not going to call out CNN’s Piers Morgan for defending Murdoch? Or are you going to be just as biased and blind as Fox News?
  6. firmanmilanisti7 reblogged this from thedailywhat
  7. themarchmyth reblogged this from thedailywhat
  8. misssuniverse reblogged this from thedailywhat
  9. sorcelations reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    All this news has been crazy.
  10. zan77 reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    Nice recap, albeit very US-centric. It misses out the most important developments of the last 48 hours, namely the...
  11. bekahdrey reblogged this from mae-b
  12. mae-b reblogged this from thedailywhat
  13. almostdan reblogged this from thedailywhat
  14. elhijodelotono reblogged this from thedailywhat
  15. therapyfortravesty reblogged this from thedailywhat
  16. reksiandari reblogged this from thedailywhat
  17. kjarktooth reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    Um.
  18. vinylsticker reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    rebloged twice b/c its important
  19. yonilotan reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    the fuck is going on?
  20. teii reblogged this from thedailywhat
  21. thecuriouslife reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    That’s why people are scared to be whistleblowers to big powers, cause shit like this happens. I don’t think he died in...
  22. pro-pineapple reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    The Wall Street Journal and Fox News are sister companies…? I did not know that. We learn something new everyday. Oh and...
  23. fantasticl4m reblogged this from thedailywhat and added:
    man -_- how i wish i was in polysci right now. despite how boring the class is, i really wanna hear what the prof has to...